In this podcast we talk about the difference between comedy (and being funny) verses having a sense of humor, and how this affects you in your job and in your life.

For this episode, we interview corporate comedian and humorist Mark Mayfield, from Kansas City, Missouri. Mark defines humor as “surprise that evokes good feeling.” What it isn’t, according to Mark, is your ability to tell a joke, be the life of the party, or generally be funny. Having a sense of humor is NOT just what we can do on stage, it’s having a healthy sense of perspective.

The second part, “Evokes good feeing” is important. Surprise is not enough… it has to be good surprise with a nice result. (Brad’s note: this component it why so many practical jokes in the workplace go wrong.)
And having a great set of comedy skills does not mean you have a sense of humor.  “I know a lot of comics who are great on stage and are manic depressive off stage. They have no sense of humor, even though they are very funny in front of an audience.”

So what’s the point? The point is that if you want to increase and improve your sense of humor (and you should,) then the good news is that you don’t have to even consider making yourself funny. You can leave the clown noses, the loud neckties, and the goofy mustache and glasses at home if you want. Put the whoopee cushion away (ok, leave that one out…. what can I say? I’m still a 14 year old boy on the inside) and concentrate on having a better sense of perspective.

People will love us (and do business with us) if we have a sense of humor, whether or not we make them laugh
Thanks Mark.

Learn more about how I teach audiences to improve their sense of humor and to create humor in their workplace here. (Keynotes, Seminars and Consulting.)


Brad Montgomery
Comedian Speaker and Motivational Humorist, Workplace Consultant, Student of Humor, Fan of Mark Mayfield

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