Here’s my advice: if you want to improve anything from your relationships to your career to a specific skill or tactic, get help.  Ask your peers.  Ask a mentor.  Hire a teacher or coach. Get help from people who already know what you need to understand.  But know that this type of improvement takes guts. 

I believe my job isn’t to be “good enough”. Or to earn evaluations that are high enough that nobody is unhappy. My job is to absolutely rock an audience in a way that everybody congratulates my client for picking the perfect speaker. The speaker that they’ll never forget. The speaker that will make next year’s speaker look bad by comparison.

It’s a great reminder that only we can control our own level of stress. And our own attitude towards a situation has a great deal to do with that.

If a motivational speaker comes in and improves the output of your team in  any business metric (attitude, attention, productivity, engagement, sales, etc.), what would be the business value of that growth?  It’s measurable and often ridiculously high.

When you hear these cliches, it’s really easy to check them off and move on to something else.  But re-mindfulness is a concept which asks you to stop and remind yourself not only WHAT those concepts mean, but HOW you are going to implement those ideas.  

My idea can help the sponsors achieve these goals in a way that is more powerful than a placard, a note by the door, or a logo or banner behind me while I’m on stage. 

Thanksgiving is coming up and perhaps this gesture just seems like a required bit of business. But I mean it. Thanks to you I’m able to spread my message.

I have always loved magic. In fact, my first ever paying gig was as a 15-year old magician. As a motivational speaker, I often (though not always) work a bit of magic into my performances every so often. And if I am really lucky, a client will hire me specifically to do a magic routine.

During my travels as a professional motivational speaker, I get to meet people from all walks of life.  And often times I find pearls of wisdom from the most unlikely sources.

Third graders love to be told they are doing a good job. They love it when you tell them they did that math problem perfectly, or that their coloring is looking awesome.

Who doesn’t love that kind of feeling? As we age, we still maintain that basic desire for acknowledgement. But for some reason, the frequency in which we receive that kind of acknowledgment and encouragement diminishes. But we STILL thrive on those types of compliments.