Here’s my advice: if you want to improve anything from your relationships to your career to a specific skill or tactic, get help.  Ask your peers.  Ask a mentor.  Hire a teacher or coach. Get help from people who already know what you need to understand.  But know that this type of improvement takes guts. 

I believe my job isn’t to be “good enough”. Or to earn evaluations that are high enough that nobody is unhappy. My job is to absolutely rock an audience in a way that everybody congratulates my client for picking the perfect speaker. The speaker that they’ll never forget. The speaker that will make next year’s speaker look bad by comparison.

It’s a great reminder that only we can control our own level of stress. And our own attitude towards a situation has a great deal to do with that.

If a motivational speaker comes in and improves the output of your team in  any business metric (attitude, attention, productivity, engagement, sales, etc.), what would be the business value of that growth?  It’s measurable and often ridiculously high.

And here’s another reason hiring a Colorado speaker is beneficial: my meeting planners ALL worry about Colorado weather. “Will weather impact Brad’s travel, will he make it to my event on time, or worse, what if he doesn’t show up?” I’m very proud to say that I have never missed an event in more than three decades, but still, my client’s anxiety about bad weather is real. Very real. So here’s the bonus: Colorado clients eliminate a huge anxiety.

When you hear these cliches, it’s really easy to check them off and move on to something else.  But re-mindfulness is a concept which asks you to stop and remind yourself not only WHAT those concepts mean, but HOW you are going to implement those ideas.  

Let’s face it: your people know what to do when it comes to how to treat other people, but they don’t always do it. They don’t need more information or training—they need motivation. This is where I can be helpful: closing the gap between what they know and what they actually do.